Universität Basel

Seminar für Soziologie
Petersgraben 27
CH-4051 Basel

Maps provided by Cornell University PJ Mode Collection of Persuasive Cartography

Concept

Conference Program

Thursday, September 26

6:15 p.m.–7:45 p.m.

Lecture hall 101, Old University (Rheinsprung 9)

Keynote: Agency, Cooperation and Oligarchy
Wolfgang Reinhard (University of Freiburg)

Friday, September 27

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology
(Petersgraben 27)

Comparing Colonialism: Introductory Remarks
Axel T. Paul (University of Basel)

10:00 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Conquest and Founding of Cities: Forms of Colonization in the Greco-Roman World
Hans-Joachim Gehrke (University of Freiburg)

11:00 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Were the Muslim Arabs who Conquered the Middle East Colonialists?
Robert Hoyland (New York University)

11:45 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Ottomans in Syria: "Turkish Colonialism" or Something Else?
James Reilly (University of Toronto)

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

An Entangled History of the British and French "Imperial Nation-States" in the Age of Revolutions, c.1770–1850
Tanja Bührer (University of Bern)

2:45 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Colonialism at the Fringes of Empire: Reassessing Afghanistan's Place in the British Colonial History, 1857–1900
Francesca Fuoli (University of Bern)

3:45 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Contradictions of British Colonialism in the Uganda Protectorate
Klaus Schlichte (University of Bremen)

Saturday, September 28

9:30 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Imperial Trajectories: The Constant Remaking of German Rule in South West Africa
Matthias Leanza (University of Basel)

10:15 a.m.–11:00 a.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Bureaucratic Tools of Emergency and Citizenship in the Colonial Past and Present: Israel/Palestine and India
Yael Berda (Hebrew University of Jerusalem)

11:15 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Indigenous Settler Colonialism? Rethinking Comanche, Lakota and Apache Expansions in North America
Janne Lahti (University of Helsinki)

2:00 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Where Russia Was "Ahead" of Europe: Russia's State Colonialism in Comparative Perspective
Michael Khodarkovsky (Loyola University Chicago)

2:45 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Japanese Colonialism and the Geopolitics of Population, Race and Nation in the Korean Imagination
Jin-kyung Park (Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul)

3:45 p.m.–4:30 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Imperialism and Colonialism: A Meaningful Distinction?
Krishan Kumar (University of Virginia)

4:30 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

Lecture hall, Musicology

Final discussion
 
 

Colonial expansion is a common, nearly universal phenomenon in human history. Though colonialism has shaped the modern world in many ways, it is not limited to modernity. Conquering foreign lands and subjugating other people(s) are basic processes in the formation of empires and states, and they existed long before the modern era. This interdisciplinary conference, hosted by the Department of Sociology at the University of Basel, seeks to explore varieties of colonialism throughout history and to uncover their common features. But, by comparing different areas, periods, and forms of colonial expansion and rule the conference will also examine the (possibly) unique characteristics of modern European expansion.

Speakers

Hans-Joachim Gehrke is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Freiburg (Breisgau) and  the Director of Outreach at University College Freiburg, Germany. He was a Professor of Ancient History at the Universities of Würzburg, FU Berlin and Freiburg (1982-2008), and President of the German Archaeological Institute (2008-2011). He is member of the Academia Europaea, the Leopoldina. Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften and the Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften. His research and publications range widely, from Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic Greece to the Roman Republic and Empire, from social and political history to the history of political concepts and theories. His main publications include Stasis: Untersuchungen zu den inneren Kriegen in den griechischen Staaten des 5. und 4. Jahrhunderts v. Chr. (1985); Geschichte des Hellenismus (4rd edn. 2008); Alexander der Grosse (6h edn. 2013, trans. into many languages), Geschichte der Antike: Ein Studienbuch (4nd edn. 2013), and Geschichte als Element antiker Kultur (2014).

Professor Hoyland read Oriental Studies at Oxford University, where he subsequently wrote a doctoral thesis on non-Muslim accounts of the rise of Islam (Seeing Islam as Others saw it, 1997). The emergence of Islamic civilization has remained a key focus of his research and is the subject of his latest book (In God’s Path: the Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire, 2014). The desire to better understand this phenomenon has led him down many different avenues of study: pre-Islamic Arabia (Arabia and the Arabs, 2001), epigraphy (“The Content and Context of Early Arabic Inscriptions”, 1997), papyrology (“The earliest attestation of the Dhimma of God and His Messenger and the rediscovery of P. Nessana 77”, 2014) and the late antique Greco-Syriac world ([with Simon Swain et al.] Polemon’s Physiognomy, 2007, and Theophilus of Edessa’s Chronicle, 2011). One avenue, archaeology, has become a passion for him in its own right and he has been involved in excavations in Syria, Yemen, Israel/Palestine and Turkey/Kurdistan. He has now embarked upon the excavation of the city of Partavi/Barda‘a in modern Azerbaijan, which was the capital of the Christian kingdom of Caucasian Albania and the site of the first Muslim garrison in eastern Caucasus.

Michael Khodarkovsky (Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1987; B.A., Kalmyk State University, Elista, Russia, 1977) is a Professor of History at Loyola University Chicago, where he teaches courses in Russian empire, comparative empires, colonialism, and Western civilization. Khodarkovsky is a historian of the Russian Empire who specializes in the history of Russia's imperial expansion into the Eurasian borderlands.  His books examined the relationship between the expanding Russian state and the non-Christian peoples across the colonial frontiers, notably in Where Two Worlds Met: the Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600-1771 (1992), Russia’s Steppe Frontier: The Making of a Colonial Empire, 1500-1800 (2002), and Bitter Choices: Loyalty and Betrayal in the Russian Conquest of the North Caucasus (2011).  He co-edited a book that explored the impact of organized religion, missionary work and religious conversion on Russia's non-Christian population in Of Religion and Empire: Missions, Conversion and Tolerance in Tsarist Russia (2001). Most recently he took a detour from his traditional interests to explore Russian and Soviet history in 100 vignettes that became his most recent book, Russia’s 20th century: A Journey in 100 Histories (2019) and to contribute frequent opinion editorials to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and other media. He is now back to completing his past and current book project on a broad comparative history of the Eurasian empires from 1500s to 1850s.

Krishan Kumar is University Professor, as well as William R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia. He was previously Professor of Social and Political Thought at the University of Kent at Canterbury, England. He received his undergraduate education at the University of Cambridge and his postgraduate education at the London School of Economics.

Professor Kumar has at various times been a Talks Producer at the BBC, a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, and a Visiting Professor at Bristol University; the University of Colorado at Boulder; the Central European University, Prague; the University of Bergen, Norway; and the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He has also been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton.

Among his publications are Prophecy and Progress: The Sociology of Industrial and Post-Industrial Society; Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times; The Rise of Modern Society; From Post-Industrial to Post-Modern Society; 1989: Revolutionary Ideas and Ideals; The Making of English National Identity; and Visions of Empire: How Five Imperial Regimes Shaped the World.

Mr. Kumar's current interests focus on empires and imperial peoples. Related interests include nationalism and nation identity, Europe, global history, and problems of historical sociology.

Interview 2016 DSC_6740.jpg

Keynote:

Agency, Cooperation and Oligarchy

University of Freiburg

Wolfgang Reinhard

gehrke_pic.jpg

Conquest and Founding of Cities: Forms of Colonization in the Greek-Roman World

University of Freiburg

Hans-Joachim Gehrke

Hoyland_pic.jpg

Were the Muslim Arabs who Conquered the Middle East Colonialists?

New York University

Robert Hoyland

Jim_FAS_2019-headshot.jpg

Ottomans in Syria: “Turkish Colonialism” or Something Else?

University of Toronto

James Reilly

Buehrer_Portraetfoto2_cut2.jpg

An Entangled History of the British and French "Imperial Nation States" in the Age of Revolutions, c. 1770–1850

University of Bern

Tanja Bührer

Fuoli_Profilbild_cut.jpg

Colonialism at the Fringes of Empire: Reassessing Afghanistan’s Place in the British Colonial History, 1857–1900

University of Bern

Francesca Fuoli

schlichte_pic.png

Contradictions of British Colonialism in the Uganda Protectorate

University of Bremen

Klaus Schlichte

s200_yael.berda.jpg

Bureaucratic Tools of Emergency and Citizenship in the Colonial Past and Present: Israel/Palestine and India

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Yael Berda

janne_lathi_pic2.jpg

Indigenous Settler Colonialism? Rethinking Comanche, Lakota and Apache Expansions in North America

University of Helsinki

Janne Lahti

michael-khodarkovsky.jpg

Where Russia Was "Ahead" of Europe: Russia's State Colonialism in Comparative Perspective

Loyola University Chicago

Michael Khodarkovsky

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Japanese Colonialism and the Geopolitics of Population, Race and Nation in the Korean Imagination

Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul

Jin-kyung Park

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Imperialism and Colonialism: A Meaningful Distinction?

University of Virginia

Krishan Kumar

I completed graduate work in History at the American University of Beirut (1981) and Georgetown University (1987). Since 1987 I have taught modern Middle East History at the University of Toronto. My work focuses on Syria and Lebanon during the Ottoman period. Published books are: A Small Town in Syria: Ottoman Hama in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (2002), The Ottoman Cities of Lebanon: Historical Legacy and Identity in the Modern Middle East (2016), and Fragile Nation, Shattered Land: The Modern History of Syria (2019).

Jin-kyung Park is Professor of Korean Studies and Associate Dean at the Graduate School of International & Area Studies, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (HUFS) in Seoul, Korea. She received her PhD in the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining HUFS, Dr. Park was an assistant professor in the Department of Historical & Cultural Studies/Women & Gender Studies Institute at University of Toronto. Professor Park’s research focuses on cultural studies and the history of colonialism, medicine, gender, and race in 20th-century Korea. Her recent articles have appeared in journals including Cultural Studies, Journal of Women’s History, and Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies. She is currently working on a monograph titled Yellow Man’s Burden: Medicine and Biopolitics in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945.

 

Organizers

 

Supported by

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Seeing Basel

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